The science behind Bowers & Wilkins diamond tweeters

Diamond-tweeter-dome

Why use diamond for tweeter domes? It may seem extravagant, but the move is simply an extension of Bowers & Wilkins’s pursuit of the perfect loudspeaker.

One element of our quest for the best is the development of drive units that neither add nor subtract from the signal. In a tweeter, that means creating a dome that remains rigid, exhibiting perfectly piston-like behaviour, as far up the frequency scale as possible. Best for this are materials with a high stiffness to density ratio – which is where diamond comes in.

In the below video,  Bowers & Wilkins Head of Research, Gary Geaves, explains the science behind diamond tweeters.

You can read more about our Diamond Tweeters and  800 Series Diamond on our website.

800 Series Diamond

1 Comment

  • kail says:

    proud owner, sound has a new meaning to me now,

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